Epic have really been doing well with Fortnite, which seems to be an invitation for lawsuits these days

As it turns out, Ribeiro’s request to copyright the Carlton Dance has recently been shot down by the US Copyright Office. They found that “the combination of these three dance steps is a simple routine that is not registerable as a choreographic work”.

Interestingly, being denied the request to copyright a dance should’ve spelt the end of Fortnite’s Dirty Dancing, but the legal team behind it are actually not quitting.

Pierce Bainbridge Beck Price & Hect insist that the matter is purely procedural in nature, meaning they’ll be back once the copyright application registrations have been completed.

At the moment, however, all four lawsuits have been dropped without prejudice, which means they can be filed again if the four somehow succeed in copyrighting movement.

Note that this does not include the case of the Running Man, although it’s safe to assume that they’ll share fates. 

What makes the Running Man case pretty special though is that the “authors” claim Epic v buck generator violated their copyrights and want $20 million for a dance they didn’t even make.

In fact, the two actually appeared with authors on The Ellen Show, where they gave a completely different account of who made the dance.

https://rhizome.org/profile/free-v-bucks-no-verification/

Epic GamesFortnite, Buried Treasure

Epic have really been doing well with Fortnite, which seems to be an invitation for lawsuits these days. While we’re certain no ruling in the world is likely to stop this practice entirely, we hope it at least makes it more difficult.

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